Mike Aiken On Vermont

April 21, 2015

in April

I can’t fully explain it but Vermont is so unique, ordinary, unspoiled, commonplace, interesting, beautiful, astonishing and ghastly that I can’t get it out of my system. I tell people it’s like your favorite jacket or pair of jeans and every favorite childhood memory and adult romantic interlude rolled into one, wrapped in a psychotic’s vision of bizarre weather.”

I am happy to welcome an old friend, the semi-mythic former Vermonter Mike Aiken to this site; he will be posting whenever the spirit moves him, perhaps even with his own photographs of New England.

His comment above is perhaps the finest description of Vermont I’ve ever come across, and one I thought had been lost forever (last seen on our refrigerator door some eight years ago, and only recently rediscovered – originally sent in an email).

He lived in a caboose near the Canadian
border for a time, and sold me some magnificent Lodgepole Pine poles for my own tipi experience in my formative years.

His first post is here.

He will also have his own tag (top right of each page), which will populate after three entries.

Enjoy!

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dreams 2B

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north cove-3065

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hillside with barn-3021

There is green emerging – new grass – up at the top of this westerly slope, just in front of the fallen down barn. It’s yet another sign of Spring, following closely as it does on the heels of the disappearing snow, and preceding the sound of peepers from these wetlands by a couple of weeks. Spring has returned!

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late winter stream-

Taken over 25 years ago, before digital. There is sometimes a beautiful, almost tropical color (opaline green ?) to both flowing and small pond water in mid to late winter – no idea how it happens – I chalk it up to snow melt, vegetation and the play of light from increased solar gain as we move toward summer. In any case, it’s a welcome sign of warmer days.

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saplines barrel-2990

The steady flow of sap in March, triggered by the day/night rhythm of temperatures moving above and below freezing, is a sure sign of Spring in the north country. The apparatus used for sap collection include the taps (inserted into the trees), the tubing (through which the sap flows – by gravity), and the collection barrel (partially visible behind the trees). The collected sap is then carted off to an evaporator, where it boils down to – voila! – maple syrup.

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saplines5-2812

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saplines2-2831

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Sap Line, Westbrook, CT

March 8, 2015

in March

saplines3-2773

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Sap Lines, Westbrook, CT

March 8, 2015

in March

saplines4-2881

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